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Interior design is a question of taste for tenants — rather than landlords

Interior design is a question of taste for tenants — rather than landlords

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The accidental landlord has given up trying to guess what style of furnishings her metro-millennial tenants would call cool. They get a bed, a sofa – and a chance to put their stamp on the place.

Most self-styled property gurus will tell you that if you furnish a rental home, you will find tenants faster than if you leave it empty — and that you will probably get more rent.

However, if you’ve got rubbish taste like me, or indeed, no taste at all, I would urge you to leave your properties empty, or at least provide only the basics and leave the flat as a largely blank canvas for tenants to furnish themselves.

 

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2018-11-30T17:13:40+00:00November 30th, 2018|
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